Translation is the process of turning observations in the laboratory, clinic, and community into interventions that improve the health of individuals and the public — from diagnostics and therapeutics to medical procedures and behavioral changes.

The translational science spectrum (T1-T4) represents each stage of research along the path from the biological basis of health and disease to interventions that improve the health of individuals and the public. Each stage builds upon and informs the others. Patient involvement is a critical feature of all stages in translation.

T1 - the process of applying discoveries generated in preclinical laboratory research to experimental studies in primates and human participants

T2 - research allows investigators to extend limited clinical observations into controlled environments (e.g., phase III clinical trials) to establish evidence-based efficacy under optimal settings

T3 - investigators establish how specific prevention and treatment strategies work in real-world community settings (e.g., phase IV trials), assessing effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and the influence on health practice. Important health agenda in the community needs to be translated back to the clinic and bench, respectively, to inform the processes of relevant application and basic discovery; these studies are considered as reverse T3 projects.

T4 - research involves the application of validated, health practices from communities to their impact on human populations. The latter is the ultimate pay-off for national and institutional investments into the translational research platform.

NIH Translational Science Fact Sheet

TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE

The institutions of the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance leverage their complementary strengths to accelerate clinical and translational education, research, and community engagement to impact health in Georgia and beyond. Translation is the process of turning observations in the laboratory, clinic, and community into interventions that improve the health of individuals and the public.

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Training

Georgia CTSA-BERD Statistical Clinic for Bio-related Research at Georgia Tech

Statistics research group directed by ISyE/BME professor Brani Vidakovic, offers free consulting for data-analysis questions in the domain of bio-related initiatives. Every Wednesday from 10:00-11:15 a.m. in the Wallace H. Coulter BME...

Training

Georgia CTSA Community-engaged Research Facilitation Survey for Academic Researchers & Faculty-Due Monday

The Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance’s Community Engagement program supports community-university research partnerships, obtains community input into university research, and increases health research in community...